Maye Shannon,
Novelist-in-the-making, 19, comma enthusiast, DEMIIIIIIIII-AH-SEXUALEHH
and has the greayest girlfriend to ever exist :3

24th April 2014

Video reblogged from are those bullet holes? with 281,627 notes

mrbutts:

ohstephyy:

my boyfriend made me leave because i haven’t stopped watching this video.

this is the most important video of my life

Source: poopinginschool

24th April 2014

Question reblogged from U keep me right with 18 notes

Anonymous asked: in the book series how do you think ACD intended to write Holmes and Watson's relationship? Many people view the series as having strong homosexual subtext, but I'm not to sure they're correct. For one the type of language that is used may be considered "coding" today, but back then it was common language, especially in the written word. Unless ARC truly intended otherwise he wouldn't have thought anything about using it because it was just a normal way of speaking. (cont)

ifyouhaveenoughnerve:

Secondly, considering how under wraps homosexuaititly was at the time, it’s quite possible that ARC didn’t even know that it existed. IF he was aware then there is also the question of his personal views. He might have been fine with it (in which case either he wasn’t too involved with religion, he himself was bisexual and was alright with it, or he knew someone whom was homosexual) or he might’ve thought it was the ultimate sin. If he didn’t know/disapproved then I can’t see him creating a love story between two men. If he did know/was alright with it then there’s the matter of a) the shame/possible danger that he and his family would’ve faced if the true nature of his work was discovered and b) his confidence in his ability to write in such a way that it would be right there in black and white and yet the majority of readers would be fooled. Considering how important his family seems to have been to ARC I can’t see him taking that sort of risk unless he had a VERY good reason.

Agh, this is such a good question! Sorry it took me so long to think out my answer. Before I start, I have to confess that I haven’t yet read all the ACD stories—I’m working on it though! So, I can’t really give a fair perspective about the canon as a whole. 

OK. With that said, I did some research about ACD’s life and homosexual subtext in literature from that time. I think you’re actually onto something really important in saying that that kind of language was so common at the time, but I take from that something a bit different than you did. Homosexuality was publicly shunned during that time period, but obviously being gay was just as common back then as it is today. In fact, it was such a sexually repressed time period that that kind of literary coding was common for straight relationships, too—if you see beds brought up in the context of a marriage, somebody’s getting it on. And the reason that kind of coding worked was because, as you said, it was such common language. That widespread usage is what made coding an effective way of letting people know what was going on without coming out and saying it.

And yes, homosexuality was definitely under wraps at the time. But I’m positive ACD knew what it was. One of the main reasons I say so is that he was quite close to Oscar Wilde, who was tried and publicly ostracized for homosexuality (it’s a hugely tragic story). He and ACD met after ACD published A Study in Scarlet, the first Holmes story, and he was so inspired by Wilde that some think he’s what convinced ACD to keep writing Holmes (ASiS was reasonably successful, but he didn’t have the kind of widespread popularity that Wilde did). That doesn’t mean he necessarily knew Wilde was gay at the time, but I’ve got no doubts that he was exposed to the concept (besides, if he’d looked at greek pottery or read greek myths at all, which he almost certainly would have, he’d have come across plenty of gay sex.) As to his personal views? He was raised Catholic and then left that religion in favor of more liberal forms of spiritual expression, first becoming an agnostic and then a spiritualist. So as far as religion at that time went, he chose to align himself with sects that would have featured comparatively (comparatively being the key word, as there was—and is—still an enormous amount of prejudice) less vehement homophobia. 

It’s true that writing a love story between two men would have been incredibly dangerous. That didn’t necessarily mean that it wouldn’t have been published, though—“The Importance of Being Earnest” was hugely successful at the time and literally used “bunburying” to mean “escaping social norms.”

Ok. With all that said, what do I think Doyle intended? Well, what I do know is that it originally started out as a bit of escapism—he had a pretty rough life himself, and by the time he’d finished writing the stories, his position was that "You may marry him, murder him, or do anything you like to him." So what do I think he wrote it as? Personally, my sense is that it was Doyle’s way of exploring the idea of homosexual love beyond sex, which really wasn’t done (most gay subtext from that time revolved around sex. Some straight subtext too, but gays were/are really victims of over-sexualization as well as stigmatization). It was a time where homosexuality was such a large and tacit part of the collective culture that I think a lot of people who had friends who were gay (as Doyle did. I don’t know enough about him to personally comment on his own sexuality) would have done a lot of private wrestling to figure out their own beliefs. Merely by having friends you know to be gay, you were going against the mainstream culture, so I think he might have had a bit of an existential crisis around the idea of homosexuality. I think he may have used the stories as a tool to explore that, which would explain his love/hate relationship with the character who made him famous. And I’ll fully admit that I’m swayed by a 21st century viewing, but I just can’t read 

"Certainly a grey mist swirled before my eyes, and when it cleared I found my collar-ends undone and the tingling after-taste of brandy upon my lips. Holmes was bending over my chair, his flask in his hand."—The Empty House

as a representation of a purely platonic relationship.

Source: ifyouhaveenoughnerve

23rd April 2014

Post reblogged from Through the Wreckage of My College Years; with 17,774 notes

dextrgrif:

everyone’s always like “omg coffee shop aus pls” and i’m just like omg:

image

Source: dextrgrif

23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from Serendipity is my Stripper Name with 154,538 notes

judal-is-my-spirit-animal:

lezly-odair:

How I feel about religion. God should be presented as what he is, love and kindness. Stop using his name to justify your racism, homo phobia and sexesim

Not gonna lie, this is pretty cute. 

judal-is-my-spirit-animal:

lezly-odair:

How I feel about religion. God should be presented as what he is, love and kindness. Stop using his name to justify your racism, homo phobia and sexesim

Not gonna lie, this is pretty cute. 

Source: lezly-odair

23rd April 2014

Post reblogged from So Many Fandoms, So Little Time. with 7,627 notes

necrophiliaczooplankton:

goldenwebs:

for every note this gets i will read a page of homestuck

good luck nerd

image

Source: voidfella

23rd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Serendipity is my Stripper Name with 225,804 notes

billtheradish:

littleheathenbones:

phrex:

One of these things is not like the others

One of these things is not quite the same

It’s the same, but different

Can’t. Not. Reblog.

Source: phrux

23rd April 2014

Photo reblogged from John Green's tumblr with 473,240 notes

babymarkers:

the-chocolate-chip-pancake:

thatsnotwatyourmomsaid:

none pizza with left beef

It should be a rule of Tumblr to always reblog none pizza with left beef

ive missed you

babymarkers:

the-chocolate-chip-pancake:

thatsnotwatyourmomsaid:

none pizza with left beef

It should be a rule of Tumblr to always reblog none pizza with left beef

ive missed you

Source: ollielephant

22nd April 2014

Post reblogged from The Little Space Cadet with 260,511 notes

lieutenantsulu:

true bonding is when you and your friends are all angry about the same thing

Source: operativelawsons

22nd April 2014

Quote reblogged from Serendipity is my Stripper Name with 21,146 notes

He’s not the first gay guy in the NFL. He’s the first one to come out, let’s get that straight. Every team I’ve played on, there was someone… we always knew. But he was cool. That was our boy. We had to look out for him. Every team I’ve played on - five different teams - there was someone gay in the locker room.

Retired football star Deion Sanders, who played in the NFL for the Atlanta Falcons, the San Francisco 49ers, the Dallas Cowboys, the Washington Redskins and the Baltimore Ravens. He is, of course, talking about Michael Sam. This is so important. (via Gay Star News)

 

(via lesighh)

Source: gaywrites

22nd April 2014

Photoset reblogged from The dark madness of Wongworld with 34,708 notes

thesilvermillenniumrp:

Lunarian fashion

Source: thesilvermillenniumrp